Support our research against cancer

The Beljanski Foundation’s overall mission is to study and share knowledge of effective non-toxic natural answers that work both alone and in synergy with traditional western medicine to cure cancer and other chronic diseases the natural way.

The importance of scientific research

The World Health Organization predicts that the number of cancers will double by 2030, and more and more of us are hearing those terrible words: “You have cancer”. Cancer has grown into a billion dollar industry, but conventional cancer treatments still involve surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Fortunately, there are natural molecules capable of selectively blocking the proliferation of cancer cells, without destroying healthy cells.

For research on these molecules to continue, we need your support …

The 2021 Foundation Research Program

The new experiments are focused on melanoma, and more specifically, the potential beneficial effects of the yellow leaf Gingko extract for an anti-melanoma effect.

Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, is on the rise. Exposure to sunlight, weakened immunity and age are all risk factors for melanoma, which if it’s not caught early, is deadly. Conventional treatments include surgery, followed by immunotherapy or chemotherapy, each of which may have limited success and are also associated with negative side effects. An alternative therapeutic approach to melanoma free of toxicity and side effects is needed now.

We know from Mirko Beljanski’s work that melanomas over express and release enzymes called ribonucleases (RNAases) that are normally involved in processing large RNA molecules into smaller fragments with different functions. The RNAases are secreted by melanomas and circulate in the bloodstream. Beljanski speculated that the secretion of abnormally high levels of these enzymes from melanomas was a marker of their cancer pathology. He went on to show that the yellow leaf Ginkgo extract suppresses the activity of the secreted RNAases. There are a total of 15 different RNAses that could be targeted by the extract, but there is one enzyme of particular interest because it can play a role in melanoma cancer progression.

Angiogenenin is an RNAase that serves to stimulate the recruitment of new blood vessels allowing further growth and spread of a tumor. Angiogenin is the signal released by cancer
cells that triggers the process of angiogenesis, the establishment of new vasculature that provides the tumor with nutrients and oxygen. Knowing that the yellow leaf Ginkgo extract is a general inhibitor of melanoma released RNAases, we want to find out if angiogenin is one of the enzymes that is targeted. Our next experiment is to test the hypothesis that yellow leaf Ginkgo specifically inhibits angiogenin. If the extract inhibits angiogenin, then it could help slow melanoma advance by preventing the development of new blood supply to the tumor.

Note that suppressing angiogenin activity is not a direct cytotoxic effect on cancer cells like the induction of apoptosis by Pao pereira and Rauwolfia vomitoria; rather it could limit tumor growth by denying sustenance. This means that the Ginkgo extract could be used in combination with the two anticancer plant extracts to provide a triple threat to melanoma: direct killing of the cancer cells by Pao and Rauwolfia, and denying the tumor’s lifeblood by Ginkgo. Animal studies would be useful to demonstrate this prospective synergy.

But first things first: suppression of angiogenin by yellow leaf Ginkgo extract is an attractive hypothesis that must be tested. Fortunately, we are working with our longstanding collaborator Dr. Qi Chen of Kansas University Medical Center to conduct the tests. Her lab has already reproduced Beljanski’s result showing general suppression of the population of RNAases secreted by melanoma. The next step is to nail down the potential suppression of angiogenin. The budget for this research project is $16,500.

When Beljanski discovered the inhibitory effect of the Ginkgo extract on RNAases, it was in the context of skin fibrosis. He found that skin exposed to radiation (e.g. radiotherapy) undergoes fibrosis accompanied by release of RNAase enzymes. He also found these enzymes are released by melanomas as well as breast and pancreatic cancers and leukemia. Recent studies have
expanded the list of cancers that secrete these enzymes. So if our experiments prove that the yellow leaf Ginkgo extract is effective against angiogenin from melanoma, it is likely to be
useful for inhibiting blood supply and limiting growth of numerous additional cancers by this mechanism.

This activity of the yellow leaf Ginkgo extract could be a breakthrough in cancer therapy providing nontoxic inhibition of vascularization of many kinds of tumors.

Skin Cancer Research: Melanoma

Our skin cancer research is focused on melanoma—the most serious kind of skin cancer. Two plant extracts, green tea extract blend (OnkoTea) and Golden Leaf of Ginkgo Biloba (Ginkgo V), will be studied for their anti-melanoma activity.

And as skin is exposed, we will explore topical in addition to oral approach…

$6,465 of $16,500 raised

June 15th 2021

Launch of our research

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Skin Cancer Research Melanoma

Pao pereira extract: Suppression of Cytokine IL-6 in Hyperinflammation

Beljanski demonstrated that the Pao pereira extract suppresses cytokine IL-6 induced proliferation of brain cancer cells (glioblastoma). He showed that the extract significantly reduces the amount of IL-6 in the cancer cells. IL-6 is also induced in some viral infections and in the case of COVID-19, it is one of the prominent cytokines in the hyperinflammation response that is associated with severe viral infections.

$1,123 of $15,000 raised

June 15th 2021

Launch of our research

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